Week 1:6 (Sept. 22-26)

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Seniors: Reading SchedulePoetry Response PacketMLA Template for Poetry ResponsesFrankenstein Response Journal, Frankenstein E-textJane Eyre Vocab AssignmentFrankenstein Vocab Assignment10 Tips for the AP Lit Multiple ChoiceFrankenstein AudiotextParadise Lost E-text, Paradise Lost Summary

Freshmen (All Periods): Colormarking #2Proofreading ExpectationsLiterary Analysis Task #1, my.hrw.com, E-text of “Night Calls”E-text of “A Story”In-Class Text-based QuestionsTurnitin.com Registration Instructions

Great Expectations (Honors)NotesVocabTheme Log, Audiotext, Colormarking #2Graphic Novelization Ch. 3-7Graphic Novelization Ch. 8-10

Of Mice and Men (2nd Period)NotesVocab

Week 1:5 (Sept. 15-19)

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Seniors: Reading SchedulePoetry Response PacketMLA Template for Poetry ResponsesFrankenstein Journal, Frankenstein E-textJane Eyre Vocab AssignmentFrankenstein Vocab Assignment10 Tips for the AP Lit Multiple Choice, Paradise LostAn Exploration of Romanticism Through Art and Poetry

Freshmen (All Periods)Proofreading ExpectationsLiterary Analysis Task #1, my.hrw.com, E-text of “Night Calls”E-text of “A Story”In-Class Text-based Questions

Great Expectations (Honors)NotesVocabTheme Log, AudiotextGraphic Novelization (Ch. 1-2)

Of Mice and Men (2nd Period)NotesVocab

 

Week 1:4 (Aug. 8-12)

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AP English Literature: Reading SchedulePoetry Response PacketMLA TemplateFrankenstein Vocab AssignmentFrankenstein Journal

English 1 Honors: Proofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesJournal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts“Once Upon a Time” PromptTheme Writing #2Great Expectations NotesGreat Expectations VocabGreat Expectations Theme Log

English 1: Proofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesJournal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts“Once Upon a Time” PromptOf Mice and Men VocabOf Mice and Men Notes

Writing Links: Avoid the Most Common Grammatical ErrorsAvoiding Plagiarism, Basic Grammar

Parts of Speech: Nouns!

Recognize a noun when you see one.  George! Jupiter! Ice cream! Courage! Books! Bottles! Godzilla! All of these words are nouns, words that identify the whos, wheres, and whats in language. Nouns name people, places, and things. Read the sentence that follows:

George and Godzilla walked to Antonio’s to order a large pepperoni pizza.

George is a person. Antonio’s is a place. Pizza is a thing. Godzilla likes to think he’s a person, is as big as a place, but qualifies as another thing.
Continue reading

Week 1:3 (Sept. 2-5)

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AP English Literature: Reading Schedule (1st Quarter)Poetry Response PacketMLA Template (for Poetry Responses)Turnitin.com Registration InstructionsJane Eyre Vocab AssignmentFrankenstein Vocab AssignmentFrankenstein Journal

English 1 Honors: English 1 Honors SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesFirst Vocab PresentationsJournal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts, “Once Upon a Time” PromptGreat Expectations Notes, Theme Writing #2

English 1: English 1 SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesFirst Vocab PresentationsJournal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts“Once Upon a Time” Prompt

Week 1:2 (Aug. 25-29)

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AP English Literature: AP Lit SyllabusReading Schedule (1st Quarter)Siddhartha Essay RubricDiscussion Question InstructionsPoetry Response PacketMLA Template (for Poetry Responses)Turnitin.com Registration InstructionsJane Eyre Journal InstructionsJane Eyre E-textJane Eyre Vocab Assignment

English 1 Honors: English 1 Honors SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesFirst Vocab Presentations (Instructions)Journal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts

English 1: English 1 SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsUsage NotesFirst Vocab Presentations (Instructions)Journal ExpectationsLiterature TermsTheme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts

Freshmen Proofreading

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journalsIf a writing assignment is completed outside of class (e.g. journals), students are expected to proofread their writing for the assignment in order to eliminate mechanical errors prior to the due date.

When working on writing assignments outside of the classroom, students should always refer to the Proofreading Expectations guide in order to ensure that submitted work meets ninth-grade expectations.  This guide will provide a list of non-negotiable errors that will not be academically tolerated in high school students’ writing.  For each of the non-negotiable errors (which are listed in each grading period’s Proofreading Expectations) that are present in a submitted assignment, 10% of the total possible points for the assignment will be deducted – up to a maximum of 50%. Continue reading

Week 1:1 (Aug. 18-22)

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Welcome to a new school year! I’ve posted the week’s agenda for all to see. This is a weekly occurrence, usually done on Friday for the week which follows. I strongly encourage students and parents to check the weekly agenda in the case of a student being absent, being confused, or simply being smart by planning ahead. Below, you’ll find downloadable versions of this week’s in-class handouts along with a few other helpful bits.

AP English Literature: Summer PacketAP Lit Syllabus, Siddhartha Essay RubricDiscussion InstructionsPoetry Response Packet, MLA Template (for Poetry Responses), Turnitin.com Registration InstructionsJane Eyre Journal InstructionsJane Eyre E-text, Plagiarism NotesReading Schedule (1st Quarter)

English 1 Honors: English 1 Honors Syllabus, Four QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsColormarking #1, Usage NotesVocab Presentation InstructionsJournal ExpectationsLiterature Terms

English 1: English 1 SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsColormarking #1Usage NotesVocab Presentation InstructionsJournal ExpectationsLiterature Terms

What’s a Bildungsroman?

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The bildungsroman (bill-DUNGZ-ro-men, German for “formation novel”) is a genre of the novel which focuses on the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood.  The driving force behind the plot (and the major impact of the work) is the main character’s search for self, so change is thus extremely important.

The birth of the bildungsroman is normally dated to the publication of Goethe’s The Apprenticeship of Wilhelm Meister in 1796.  Although the bildungsroman originated in Germany, it has had extensive influence first in Europe and later throughout the world.  Thomas Carlyle translated Goethe’s novel into English, and after its publication in 1824, many British authors wrote novels inspired by it (e.g. Dickens’ Great Expectations).

A bildungsroman tells about the growing up or coming of age of a sensitive person who is looking for answers and experience.  The genre evolved from folklore tales of an idiot or youngest son going out in the world to seek his fortune.  Usually in the beginning of the story there is an emotional loss which makes the protagonist leave on his or her journey.  In a bildungsroman, the goal is maturity, and the protagonist achieves it gradually and with difficulty.  The genre often features an underlying conflict between the main character and society.  Typically, the values of society are gradually accepted by the protagonist, and he or she is ultimately accepted into society – the protagonist’s mistakes and disappointments are over.  In some works, the protagonist is able to reach out and help others after having achieved maturity.