Week 1:2 (Aug. 31-Sept. 4)

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AP English Literature (Seniors): Course Syllabus, Discussion Prep, Jane Eyre Journal & Turnitin Registration InstructionsJane Eyre E-text, Jane Eyre Vocab AssignmentPoetry Response Packet, MLA Template (for Poetry Responses), Plagiarism Notes, Siddhartha Essay RubricRemind for A-Day Class, Remind for B-Day Class

English 1 Honors (Freshmen): Course SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading Expectations, Usage NotesVocab Presentation InstructionsJournal ExpectationsLiterature Terms, Theme Writing #1“A Quilt of a Country” Prompts, “The Scarlet Ibis” E-textRemind for A-Day Classes, Remind for B-Day Classes

Freshmen Proofreading

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journalsIf a writing assignment is completed outside of class (e.g. journals), students are expected to proofread their writing for the assignment in order to eliminate mechanical errors prior to the due date.

When working on writing assignments outside of the classroom, students should always refer to the Proofreading Expectations guide in order to ensure that submitted work meets ninth-grade expectations.  This guide will provide a list of non-negotiable errors that will not be academically tolerated in high school students’ writing.  For each of the non-negotiable errors (which are listed in each grading period’s Proofreading Expectations) that are present in a submitted assignment, 10% of the total possible points for the assignment will be deducted – up to a maximum of 50%. Continue reading

Week 1:1 (Aug. 24-28)

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  • Blue GETs on the agenda indicate a handout being physically distributed in class.
  • Green s indicate classroom activities such as groupwork, lectures, and lessons.
  • Red words like DUE or QUIZ indicate an assignment due date or assessment.

Welcome to a new school year! I’ve posted the week’s agenda for all to see. This is a weekly occurrence, usually done on Thursday afternoon for the week which follows. Please refer to the key above to make clearest sense of the agenda. You can also click on the agenda board for a larger zoom-able image. Below, you’ll find downloadable versions of this week’s in-class handouts along with a few other helpful documents.

AP English Literature (Seniors): Summer PacketCourse Syllabus, Discussion Prep, Jane Eyre Journal & Turnitin Registration InstructionsJane Eyre E-textPoetry Response Packet, MLA Template (for Poetry Responses), Plagiarism Notes, Remind for A-Day Class, Remind for B-Day Class

English 1 Honors (Freshmen): Course SyllabusFour QuestionsProofreading ExpectationsColormarking, Usage NotesVocab Presentation InstructionsJournal ExpectationsLiterature Terms, “The Scarlet Ibis” E-textRemind for A-Day Classes, Remind for B-Day Classes

What’s a Bildungsroman?

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The bildungsroman (bill-DUNGZ-ro-men, German for “formation novel”) is a genre of the novel which focuses on the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood.  The driving force behind the plot (and the major impact of the work) is the main character’s search for self, so change is thus extremely important.

The birth of the bildungsroman is normally dated to the publication of Goethe’s The Apprenticeship of Wilhelm Meister in 1796.  Although the bildungsroman originated in Germany, it has had extensive influence first in Europe and later throughout the world.  Thomas Carlyle translated Goethe’s novel into English, and after its publication in 1824, many British authors wrote novels inspired by it (e.g. Dickens’ Great Expectations).

A bildungsroman tells about the growing up or coming of age of a sensitive person who is looking for answers and experience.  The genre evolved from folklore tales of an idiot or youngest son going out in the world to seek his fortune.  Usually in the beginning of the story there is an emotional loss which makes the protagonist leave on his or her journey.  In a bildungsroman, the goal is maturity, and the protagonist achieves it gradually and with difficulty.  The genre often features an underlying conflict between the main character and society.  Typically, the values of society are gradually accepted by the protagonist, and he or she is ultimately accepted into society – the protagonist’s mistakes and disappointments are over.  In some works, the protagonist is able to reach out and help others after having achieved maturity.

14 Words You Need to Know

Below is a table containing the words that make all the difference in a competent user of English, because according to James I. Brown, Professor of Rhetoric at the University of Minnesota, in his book Programmed Vocabulary, they contain the twenty most useful prefixes and the fourteen most important roots in our language. These constituent parts make up over 14,000 words in a collegiate dictionary size or close to an estimated 100,000 words in an unabridged dictionary. In other words, you should know these words and understand why they mean what they mean since doing so will grant you a superior vocabulary.  Click it for a slightly larger view.